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Active & Travel Fashion by Bago Studio

Active wear the looks like every day fashion!

No one likes bicycle lycra, especially not Bicycle Babes, but I have to admit it is kinda comfy!

Lucky we have Bicycle Babes like Bago Studio designer, Kellie Mobbs, who has a mission is to create beautiful active wear and lifestyle fashion for Bicycle Babes, adventurers and travelers alike.

Lycra is it not, but she uses super strechy high-performance fabrics including bamboo, wicking polyester and liquid titanium PET to craft stylish fashion for active outtings, adventure expeditions and every day bicycle travels.

I tested out a sample skirt from Bago and here’s how is shapes up:
The Good
1. Adjustable waist – while riding a bicycle the waistline of your jeans or skirt makes a massive difference. Personally I find low wasited garments the most comfortable by bicycle,

Best Bicycle Rain Cape – Happy Days!

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Happy Rainy Days are a Dutch company started by two amazing women who “though there should be more happiness on rainy days” and so created a fashion line of rainware for all occasions. I tested out their rain cape for bicycle occasions!

THE GOOD
1. Fashion – there is nothing better than functional clothing that’s also a fashion piece. Happy Rainy Day’s capes capture the art of looking great while feeling good.

2. Collar – Happy Rainy Days have perfected the bicycle rain-cape collar. It comes right up to your cheeks, completely seals out the rain with both a zip and velcro, and then opens wide for easy removal. Superb!

3. Hood – this cape has a really generous hood that completely covers your forehead, can be drawn tight around the face and loosened for quick removal.

Duxback Rain Poncho – Carradice

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Carradice are the ‘original british bicycle bag company’ and they sure make a lot of bags, but we wanted to test their rain poncho!

THE GOOD
1. Eco Friendly – waxed cotton is the original water-proof fabric so it’s eco-friendly at the end of its life cycle, cotton production is not always sustainable.

2. Extra Large – this cape is BIG, it covers everything at the front and back.

3. Waist Strap – the cape also has a waist tie that helps to keep the whole cape in place.

4. Reflective – the cape has ScotchliteT reflective strips on the back, making you bright at night!

5. Fabric Finish – waxed cotton can be re-proofed to keep it water tight for years to come.

Bicycle Rain Cape from Cyclette

Red Riding Hood Rain Cape from Cyclette!

Red Riding Hood Rain Cape from Cyclette!

Cyclette are a bicycle fashion house based in Sydney and they have crafted a rain cape.

We tested out their Pursuit Poncho in Melbourne’s Spring rains, here’s what we discovered on the ride.

THE GOOD
1. Cool Colour – A red cape is perfect for staying bright on a cloudy day and it looks hot!

2. Medium Weight Fabric – Cyclette’s Poncho uses a mid-weight waterproof fabric which makes it a little bulky when folded and heavier than the Cleverhood cape.

3. Peaked Hood – the shaping of the hood is superbe. It fits snuggly to your head, has draw cords to keep it in place, and has a peak which helps keep the rain away.

New Bicycle Rain Cape – Cleverhood

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A rain cape, for the rare occassions you get caught in a shower, is a bicycle-babe wardrobe essential!

But finding the perfect rain cape is harder than avoiding rain storms!

In all my years of the bicycle life I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve been caught in a down pour.

It just so happens that one of those rare occassions was last week while testing out the US-made rain cape – Cleverhood

I had high hopes for a cape named Cleverhood and it lived up to all of them, with the exception of two.

I’ll get to the two exceptions in a moment, they are critical, but first what I love about it:

THE GOOD
1.

Looking hot but keeping your cool

Three tips for looking hot whilst keeping your bicycle cool by a UK Australian bicycle babe Clare Powell.

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Born in the UK and spending most of my childhood in Ballarat, it’s fair to say my tolerance for Melbourne’s scorching summers is, well, non existent.  In fact, one of the things that put me off riding a bike was the fear of arriving at my destination a tomato-faced sweaty betty.

Luckily I’ve learnt a thing, or two over, the last few summers.  Here are my top tips!

1. Speed

This one’s a no brainer for seasoned bicycle babes but hearing this tip for the first time was an epiphany for me: SLOW DOWN!  Simple yes, but with the “kill or be killed” mentality on the roads and constant messages from bicycle campaigners that cycling is “great exercise,” too often we feel the need to keep up,

How to keep dry on a bicycle in the rain

bicycle photos from Melbourne

If you’re going to get caught out in the rain, at least arrive on a hot set of wheels.

Being a bicycle babe requires taking a reality check in the rain department: water neither stains nor maims and has the brilliant physical property of evaporation!

That’s the first piece of the puzzle on how to keep dry when it rains, you don’t!  Instead, you get a little wet and it evaporates as soon as you’re no longer in the rain, easy!

There is a little more to it than that, in fact there are a million blogs out there all giving you the top ten tips for riding in the wet, surprisingly they all fall very short of the mark.

Here are the real secrets to riding in the rain:

1. Silk trousers – no matter what,

The Best Women’s Bicycle Trouser

The modern Capri pant is the ultimate combination of functionality and femininity, and they have to be one of my favourite bicycle trouser styles.

It’s a style that enhances the female figure with proper hips and a waist for a truly classic look, while the tapered leg that ends just above the ankle, or just below the knee, make for the ultimate action pant: no flare to tangle in bicycle chains, dangle in puddles or catch on stiletto heels.

The style works so well that the Capri has been around since the beginning of women wearing trousers, in fact it was the beginning.

Some say Capri pants were introduced by European fashion designer Sonja de Lennart in 1948, and were named after the Italian isle of Capri, where they rose to popularity in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

But the prelude to the Capri began long before that,

Experience The Freedom and Fashion Of A Bicycle For Christmas

You know it’s the silly season when a man bicycles past wearing a suit and a very large paier-mache possum hat.

That’s one of the best things about bikes: you actually get to sport –to wear, display, carry,  especially with ostentation, show off –  your finest outfits.

Travel by car and only the front office staff notice your new shoes. Travel by bike and the whole world gets to share in the fun of your sartorial splendor, be that a possum hat or a pair of Jimmy Choo’s.

Frankly, what is fashion for other than to flaunt, and what is transport for other than to give us a sense of the freedom to go where we please with ease, and what is life for other than to have fun.

So if you want a Christmas filled with fun, fashion and freedom,

Bicycle Fashion From Recycled Fabrics.

The designers behind Melbourne-made ‘a name is a label’, Lina Didzys and Nicole Fautsen, create their one-of pieces from second-hand, vintage and new-source fabrics.

Spot #1

A Name Is A Label – blue & white pattern sculpture dress. Bicycle – 70s dragster – Quoll’s Vintage Cycles

Inspired by surrealism and the attitude of the 80’s their designs are edgy and sculptural to the max!

Designer Nico says, “The concept behind these four dresses is ‘stage wear for the streets’.

A Name Is A Label - berry collage dress

A Name Is A Label – berry collage dress

“The dresses use a combination of textiles, juxtaposing different textures, patterns and colours. All the fabrics are re-used, either because they were discarded or excess”.

“The materials are transformed into innovative new garments that are playful and unexpected. The work provides new possibilities, giving new life to the materials themselves,